A Favorite Springtime Activity + Tons of Ideas for Speech and Language Development

Hi there!

We hope you had an amazing weekend. Ours wrapped up with a little bit of lesson planning for the week, which we'd love to share with you!

Spring is a particularly fun time for creating and assembling activities for speech therapy. It's a season that lends itself to many themes that are great for language and articulation development (think garden, bugs, weather changes, animals and their babies, etc.). Today we're showing you one of our favorite spring/Easter-themed activities, which you can easily recreate at home: an Easter grass sensory bin! (For more information about sensory bins and sensory play, check out this post by Little Bins for Little Hands.)

For us, this has turned out to be one of those materials whose possibilities are endless. Take a look at some of the ways we use it, and please let us know what you do with it in the comments section below!

Start by filling a plastic bin with Easter grass, like so: 

 We chose a clear plastic bin, which lets the kiddos visually explore its contents before diving in, but assembling this in an opaque bin may give you a chance to build some predictions in to the beginning of the activity as well  ("What do you think might be inside of this bin? Listen as I shake it. Now what do you think is in there? You take a turn shaking it. What could it be?").

We chose a clear plastic bin, which lets the kiddos visually explore its contents before diving in, but assembling this in an opaque bin may give you a chance to build some predictions in to the beginning of the activity as well ("What do you think might be inside of this bin? Listen as I shake it. Now what do you think is in there? You take a turn shaking it. What could it be?").

Now for the fun part...fill your grassy bin with cool stuff! You can fill it with objects that all start with the same sound or all fall into the same category, like we did for this Bin o' Bugs:

  Wind-up bugs are always a hit.

Wind-up bugs are always a hit.

Or throw a bunch of different objects in there and use this activity to talk about similarities/differences, expand knowledge of adjectives, and practice sorting into categories:

  When children are learning categories, it's helpful to offer visual clues for how and where to group items. This can be done with written category names (e.g., "Insects," "Ocean Animals," "Farm Animals"), pictures, containers, or even just pieces of paper in different colors.  

When children are learning categories, it's helpful to offer visual clues for how and where to group items. This can be done with written category names (e.g., "Insects," "Ocean Animals," "Farm Animals"), pictures, containers, or even just pieces of paper in different colors.  

To make this activity more Easter-y, put your objects inside plastic eggs and bury those in the grass:

  Not only is this fun and visually appealing, but it adds a bunch of new opportunities for grammar and vocabulary development. Practice phrases ("I found a purple/blue/green/pink egg"), verbs ("I  will open  the blue egg," "I  opened  the pink egg"), and location words ("I found a pig  inside  the purple egg"). The possibilities are endless!     P.S. how cute is that teeny tiny pig?!

Not only is this fun and visually appealing, but it adds a bunch of new opportunities for grammar and vocabulary development. Practice phrases ("I found a purple/blue/green/pink egg"), verbs ("I will open the blue egg," "I opened the pink egg"), and location words ("I found a pig inside the purple egg"). The possibilities are endless! 

P.S. how cute is that teeny tiny pig?!

In addition to the ideas listed above, this bin is a great tool for:

  • Establishing joint attention 
  • Requesting and labeling
  • Answering yes/no and "wh" questions
  • Following single and multistep directions
  • Practicing specific sounds 

What are your favorite Spring activities to do with your kids? Let us know by leaving us a comment below!